Before & After
After
Steve Neff handpainted a
trompe l'oeil window scene of
the beach which completely
disguised the panel and socket.
Before
Steve Neff was commissioned
by Edgar's Restaurant located in
the Links Course Clubhouse at
Wild Dunes, Isle Of Palms, SC.
Before
This Florida customer chose to
have Steve Neff paint a mural   
in their dining room to create an
open, airy feel.  The piece was
painted on canvas in the

Painted Palms Studio
.
Before
This bare wall needed color and
a bold statement to accent the
customer's
Tommy Bahama
furniture set.
After
There was not enough space in
the room for a live plant, so
Steve Neff handpainted
a broad leaf palm.
Before
This stair landing used to be
decorated with a table and
framed art.  The customer
wanted a large piece to fill the
20 foot wall space.
After
Steve Neff worked with the
customer to decide on an 8 feet
by 4 feet trompe l'oeil window
scene of their local lighthouse
painted on sculpted board.
Before
The bare walls in this lanai
needed a punch of color
and excitement..
After
Rather than paint a mural on the
wall, the customer decided to
add handpainted skylights to the
ceiling.  Visitors can't miss this
accent as they enter the home.
Before
This Mount Pleasant customer
wanted to change the look of
her white walls with
faux painting.
Before
The electric panel in this laundry
room located at the end of a
hallway needed to be disguised.
All images and web page content is copyright@ 2003 by Steve Neff
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Painted Palms of Mount Pleasant

2004 Andover Way
Mount Pleasant, SC 29466
(843)884-0730
steve@paintedpalms.com
Before
This Kiawah Island customer
wanted a mural painted directly
on the electric panel and wall
socket in her kitchen.
After
A three-panel mural was
handpainted to create the illusion
of looking out over the Links
Course while dining.
After
Once the mural was complete,
Steve Neff installed the piece on
their wall using wallpaper paste
thus giving the effect of it being
painted directly to the wall.
After
Steve Neff used a faux painting
technique to give this kitchen
a true Tuscany feel.  
After
Steve Neff used a clever and
ingenious technique applying a
gallery wrap giclee to a framed
support allowing the customer to
access the panel simply by opening
the "
The Oak" like a door.